Description

SKU# 5165500663
Manufactuer: FNH
Caliber: 5.56x45mm
Barrel Length: 18"
Overall Length: 35.7"-39"
Optic: Leupold VX-6 1-6x24mm
Color: Blue/Black

FEATURES
The combination of battle-proven durability and competition-tested performance has given rise to the FN 15 Competition. The near custom-built rifle, tested on the firing lines of the 2015 3-Gun Nation Finals, features an 18-inch alloy-steel, cold hammer-forged and chrome-lined match grade barrel with SureFire ProComp-556 muzzle break make for a very stable and flat-shooting rifle. The Mega Arms 16-inch rail system with M-LOK, Magpul MOE furniture and Timney Competition single-stage trigger provide the added real estate and quick-breaking trigger for more precise and accurate shooting. For the ultimate competition AR, look no further than the FN 15 Competition.

Other Features:

FN Custom Leupold VX-6 1-6x24mm Multigun with FireDot Green BDC Reticle with mount system

Cold hammer-forged, chrome-plated, 18" barrel chambered in 5.56x45mm NATO for increased accuracy, long life and ease of cleaning. It features a steel low profile gas block

Rifle-length gas system and "H2" buffer to soften recoil and provide smooth operation

SureFire ProComp 556 muzzle break, providing reduced recoil and quicker follow-up shots

Billet Upper and Lower from 7075 T651 Aluminum, anodized blue, and ambidextrous bolt catch release light weight free-float forearm for increased accuracy, longer grip surface with M-LOK mounting system

Carrier and Bolt Assembly is Nickel-Boron (NiB) coated for improved lubricity and laser marked

Magpul MOE-SL collapsible butt stock, MOE pistol grip for increased ergonomics

Timney trigger for improved accuracy

2 MagPul PMAG 30 AR/M4 GEN M3 with 2 Taran Tactical Extension for increased durability

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Comments (13)

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A forging is mechanically superior to "billet" due to the grain flow of the material during the forging process. So you're paying a $200 premium for an inferior set of receivers. Is a beauty contest part of a normal 3-gun contest?

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A forging has granular flow, yes.....but it cannot be as precise as a billet that is machined to exact dimensions.
It's basically slammed into a fixture, not exactly a way to be accurate.
I'll take the loss of 2% strength and enjoy the greater precision of billet any day.

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All forgings get milled to the same level of precision as billet parts. Why would you think a forging results in a less precise finished part?

The strength difference between equivalent dimensioned parts is more than 2%.

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That comment is so wrong I don't even know where to begin.
Go to your local gunstore and ask if you can physically touch a billet and a forged lower (you are old enough, right ?).
Then come back and tell us how a forged lower is machined (if it was machined to the same level it would become a billet lower ya dolt).

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OK, lets split some hairs here....

Can a forged part be machined to the same tolerances as those of a billet part? Yes, but doing so eliminates the reason for using a forging to begin with...which is to reduce manufacturing time and costs. Manufacturers that begin with billet stock do so because they intend to manufacture the end product to tolerances tighter than industry standard (i.e. mil-spec) or perform intricate mill work that isn't practical (or as nice aesthetically) as if they were to use a forging. But that doesn't mean it can't be done, only that doing so would increase costs through additional manufacturing expenses...and if the end cost will be similar, starting with a billet only makes sense.

As for which is stronger, that depends on the type and temper of material used. Forgings can’t be made from the same material types and tempers available in billet form. With all things being equal (i.e. both forged and billet lowers manufactured from 6061-T6) the forged lower should be slightly stronger (a few percent) over the billet lower. But, with that being said, most billet lowers are manufactured from 7075-T6, which is stronger than 6061-T6. So, at the end of the day, an AR using milled parts will typically be built to tighter tolerances and be stronger than an AR built using forgings, but it will also cost more due to increased material waste and increased machine time.

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Why would you say that you can't forge the same alloy that you can machine from solid? Both 6000 and 7000 series aluminum are routinely forged. The T6 is the heat treatment which is a post process and unrelated to whether it was forged.

All functional features on an AR lower or upper receiver are 100% machined. The features left in as-forged condition is only the exterior of the receivers that don't touch anything. So all things being equal, a well machined forging of equal base material and heat treatment is superior to one machined from bar stock.

Unless you're taking that bad boy to a beauty contest the bar stock receiver is an inferior product.

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You're right, and I'll take a mulligan on that one as I should have been more specific. In molten form, 7000 series aluminum have a higher viscosity than do 6000 series aluminum's, which makes them more difficult to forge into complex shapes (think AR15 lower with multiple corners and radius') which in turn increases scrap rate due to imperfections and voids. Impossible, no, but not nearly as cost effective or as easy as using 6061. For simpler shapes (i.e. optic tubes and bases), 7075 forgings are often used by some of the top optic manufacturers.

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Extrusion is the word you're looking for and got lost on the way to it.

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Obviously you are a metallurgist with a masters in cnc machining skill.
Oh wait....you've confused steel with aluminum, misunderstood how the forging process happens, not understood machining, and have not a single clue on aluminum alloys.
Stop with the google and wikipedia, they won't aid you.
I suggest reading a few books like thermodynamics a study in dimensional stability, alloys and their relationship to our world....and other such drivel I studied before you were born.

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Confused steel with aluminum? Ha! I hate stooping to your level of insults, but I really enjoyed your comment above that said "if it was machined to the same level it would become a billet lower ya dolt." That's hilarious as I've never seen a forging magically turn into a billet just because it was machined to a particular tolerance!

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Sorry but I see nothing here to justify the price. Its a few layers of lipstick on a regular old pig of an AR rifle. One could build a much better rifle for that amount of money. Sure the "added" features are nice, great optic, trigger, and brake but again those can be had and a custom rifle built for less.

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Thats because you're blind.
Loopy VX6 = 1000$
Billet upper and lower at least 350-400'ish
Timney trigger bout a buck fiddy
Surefire brake another buck fiddy
Mega Arms rail (they were bought out by Zev but made the best damn stuff out there and it wasn't cheap)
So, you're at about 1700'ish plus a kick ass FN barrel, no idea on the rail, all the other bits and pieces like the Taran mag extensions that are not cheap and so on and so on.
Exactly what level of High point you're going to build are you putting up against this proven 3 gun competition rifle again ?
Yea, thought so.

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I don’t disagree with the cost assessment. In the end, I think I’ll stick with my MPR for $2000 less. If I get the use out of that, I’ll be perfectly happy.

For those that take the plunge, good luck.

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